Ford Mondeo Vignale Estate

    • image

    Want this car at a great price?

    Request a callback and we'll find you a great price to buy or lease.
    • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.
    Derivative
    FORD Mondeo Vignale Estate
    2.0 Hybrid 5dr Auto
    FORD Mondeo Vignale Estate
    2.0 Hybrid [Lux] 5dr Auto

    Review Of The Ford Mondeo Vignale Estate

    The Ford Mondeo Vignale Estate is Fords attempt to take on luxury so if you’ve for a long time wanted the mainstream Ford brand to offer a flagship car with luxury car goodies then here it is. The problem for Ford themselves is that premium-ising their estate means that it competes with all the prestigious big guns, including BMW, Audi and Mercedes.

    The car was launched at the end of 2015 and has sold poorly so far. Buyers , on the whole, remain unconvinced. Ford, though, are confident with this particular one. After all, most of the Mondeo’s sold are the higher specs, with customers wanting something more from their mainstream Estate. And the idea is that the Vignale sub-brand is as good as things get.

    OSV takes a closer look at what this one is all about with our Ford Mondeo Vignale Estate review.

    On The Road

    Ford Mondeo Vignale Estate side view driving on road

    The engine range for the Estate is not as expansive or as interesting as the engine range for the Vignale Saloon. The car OSV took for a test drive was powered by an experienced turbocharged 2.0-litre diesel unit, which develops 180bhp and is paired with an automatic ‘box. It also comes with four-wheel drive as standard and subsequently has plenty of shove.

    It’s decently quick, too, and can get you from rest to 62mph in a respectable 9.5 seconds before maxing out at 137mph. Performance is solid enough, while the transmission is smooth. It can, however, get a bit bogged down if you catch it in the wrong gear.

    Ford Mondeo’s have in the past always been very driver-focused, very engaging and even fun to drive. Not so much this time around. Instead, Ford has put more emphasis on comfort than anything else.

    Handling is still on the whole good, though, but you’ll quickly come to the conclusion that this isn’t the type of car that will inspire confidence on twisting roads. As such, you’ll do what you can to avoid snake-like routes homes. The four-wheel drive system obviously adds more weight to the car’s already sizeable frame, and you can certainly feel it when you’re out and about.

    The car is super comfortable out on the motorway and makes for an excellent cruiser. Driver involvement is not fantastic, and Ford have certainly watered down this car’s drivability.

    Ford Mondeo’s have in the past always been very driver-focused, very engaging and even fun to drive. Not so much this time around. Instead, Ford has put more emphasis on comfort than anything else.

    Handling is still on the whole good, though, but you’ll quickly come to the conclusion that this isn’t the type of car that will inspire confidence on twisting roads. As such, you’ll do what you can to avoid snake-like routes homes. The four-wheel drive system obviously adds more weight to the car’s already sizeable frame, and you can certainly feel it when you’re out and about.

    Interior, Design & Build

    This is a very commanding and assured-looking car. It’s the best looking Mondeo yet, and one of the most handsome estate’s knocking about today.

    Like the Vignale saloon, the interior is hit and miss. This is a premium-priced car competing with the likes of Audi, a brand who are master craftsmen at interior quality. Unfortunately, the Vignale has premium pretensions but has failed to deliver completely.

    Ford Mondeo Vignale Estate Interior Dashboard

    While there are certainly a fair amount of top-notch materials adorning the cabin, it’s all let down by hard plastics which aren’t too difficult to spot, and which are ugly relics from this car’s basic roots. The electric tailgate (which is optional) is frustratingly slow, while digital dials – which are par for the course in this class – are missing. The infotainment system, meanwhile, is not as user-friendly or as slick as it really should be.

    Ford Mondeo Vignale Estate Boot space

    The car offers plenty of headroom, while the windows are big enough to brighten up an otherwise rather dull interior. Two adults should be able to sit in comfort in the back, though three would be a bit pinched for space. Access is easy thanks to wide opening doors, but the boot is a bit of a disappointment – measured at 525-litres, it’s actually smaller than its predecessors. Still, it’s very usable thanks to a small load lip and a large opening. The floor, moreover, is flat.

    Equipment

    Standard equipment is good, but there are items on the list of optional extras that we would have expected to have come as part of the purchase price. For example, rear privacy glass is not standard, and will cost you an extra £200. A heated steering wheel, meanwhile, will cost you a further £125, while for £400 more you can get an electric tailgate.

    Inflatable seats are available for £175, but they’re not really worth the money or the hassle. They’re just not compatible with most child seats.

    Cost Of The Ford Mondeo Vignale Estate

    Prices for the new car start out from £33,000 and rise to £36,000 if you buy up all the options. This is pretty much what you’d pay for the saloon variant.

    Fuel economy is pretty much competitive with its rivals, and the turbocharged 2.0-litre diesel engine can achieve returns of 52.3mpg. Emissions, though, should be better – the car emits 141g/km of CO2, which means it’s a worse polluter than most of its competitors in this class.

    One of the reasons for this is the four-wheel drive system, while Ford have also not introduced the kind of advanced energy-saving technology that other’s have.

    Can you see yourself racing around in the Ford Mondeo Vignale? Before you do that, we recommend having a look at their history

    Pros and Cons Of The Ford Mondeo Vignale Estate

    Pros:

     

    Comes With Lots Of Safety Features

    The Vignale Estate was handed five stars by Euro NCAP for safety. Adult occupation was given an 86% rating, while child occupation got an 82% rating.

    It’s very strongly constructed and is much safer than the previous model. Safety features include City safe automatic braking, inflatable rear seat belts, and adaptive cruise control.

     

    Smart Looking

    The Mondeo Estate itself is quite a new car, so there isn’t much to compare it to from the past. However, Estate’s are not generally known for their smart looks, and while they are getting more handsome all the time, the princely Vignale Estate is arguably one of the most aesthetically pleasing.

     

    Well Equipped

    One of this car’s major selling points is its long list of standard equipment. Included in the purchase price is an assortment of goodies that includes automatic wipers and headlights, smart interior lighting, satellite navigation, leather sports seats and LED headlights.

    Cons:

     

    Interior Not As Good As Its Rivals

    If Ford really want their flagship sub-brand to outcompete their premium rivals, they will need to produce better cabins. Although there is a lot to like, there are also things to dislike, such as the amount of hard plastics scattered around the interior. Room for improvement.

     

    Not Much Fun To Drive

    For whatever reason, Ford decided to improve comfort at the expense of drivability. It is far from the worst estate to drive in the world; it lacks the sharp handling and engagement of its predecessor.

    Ford Mondeo Vignale Estate vs Volkswagen Passat Estate vs BMW 3 Series Touring Estate

    Let’s see how the Ford measures up against its rivals in the comparison section of our Ford Mondeo Vignale Estate review.

    Ford Mondeo Vignale Estate vs Volkswagen Passat Estate

    It’s rare that an Estate takes all the boxes, but the Volkswagen Passat Estate comes mighty close.

    Like the Mondeo, the Passat Estate isn’t going to rock your world on the road, but it is comfortable, quiet and even refined. The driving experience would best be described as middle of the road and nothing better.

    It’s actually in its eighth generation now, and handling has improved from last time around thanks to the excellent work of the engineers who have managed to shave 85kg off the kerb weight. It’s also been stiffened for enhanced agility.

    There are no petrol engines offered, so your choice is strictly limited to a couple of diesel units. The engines are all powerful and performative enough, with even the entry-level 1.6-litre TDI capable of offering a pleasing amount of pace. The 2.0-litre TDI is the best all-rounder, though, and can get from rest to 62mph in 8.9 seconds, which makes it marginally quicker than the Mondeo.

    The Passat is very cheap to run, with the most frugal engine in the range able to achieve fuel economy returns of a remarkable 76.5mpg. Emissions are so low that road tax won’t cost you a penny. The model is also exempt from the London congestion charge.

    Like the Ford, the Passat is well equipped. The interior is mostly on par with the Vignale Estate’s regarding quality, though thanks to the lack of hard plastics, this VW probably just edges things. Soft leather seats, a very usable 8” touchscreen and a whole host of standard goodies, including air conditioning, make the cabin a very pleasant place to be.

    The Passat Estate is also very practical, and its mammoth 650-litre boot is over 100-litres bigger than the Ford’s.

     

    Price:

    Ford – £33,000 – £36,000

    Volkswagen – £24,000 – £41,000

    Ford Mondeo Vignale Estate vs. BMW 3 Series Touring Estate

    This family car has not sold well at all, and it isn’t all that hard to see why. Ford has made a few oversights here, and it feels very much like a dummy run. The engine is capable enough, but premium cars like this have to over-deliver against expectations. This one largely under-delivers.

    The interior isn’t up to scratch, a big concern when interior quality matters so much for the success of luxury family cars. And if Ford believes they can tempt buyers away from the likes of Mercedes and Audi with free car washes and a bit more equipment, they’re close to losing the plot. The Ford Mondeo Vignale Estate is certainly a good car – but you have to question whether it’s really worth it.

    Verdict Of Our Ford Mondeo Vignale Estate Review

    If you’ve taken a look at the 3 Series saloon, the BMW 3 Series Touring Estate packs all of that car’s good stuff – the fantastic economy, performance and handling – but adds more size and versatility.

    Despite the increase in size, the 3 Series Estate is a very sharp handler. It is, in fact, the best car to drive in this class. The steering is accurate but not overly heavy, while you always have a sound idea of how much grip your front tyres have got.

    xDrive four-wheel drive is on offer for improved drivability during the winter, but it will bump up your fuel bills.

    There are plenty of diesel and petrol engines to choose from, and all are quicker than the Vignale Estate. The 335 Touring xDrive is especially rapid, and can haul this hulking car from rest to 62mph in just 4.9 seconds. Fuel economy is still very respectable, and the engine returns 50mpg while emitting 148g/km of CO2.

    The petrol engines aren’t too thirsty. The 318i Touring kicks things off and can achieve returns of 49.6mpg while emitting 133g/km of CO2.

    Although this BMW is a super performer and handler, it’s still very comfortable. This is largely down to various driving modes you can switch between which alter the vehicle’s suspension. The interior itself is beautifully put together, with the logical and user-friendly iDrive infotainment control system a real highlight. Overall, the Ford cannot match the BMW for cabin quality.

    The BMW also offers bags of standard equipment, including air conditioning, satellite navigation, Bluetooth phone connectivity and cruise control, but the 495-litre boot is smaller than the Mondeo’s. It can be extended to 1,500-litres if you fold the rear seats, and also comes with a split-opening boot lid which proves its worth whenever both your hands are full of baggage. It’s also a very usable boot and comes with bag hooks, a cargo net and a folding floor divider.

     

    Price:

    BMW – £27,000 – £42,000

    Is the Ford Mondeo Vignale the car for you? Let’s take a look at how reliable  Ford are on the road

    Get in touch with a Vehicle Specialist Today!

    Fill out the form below with your details, and one of our highly qualified specialists will be in contact within 24 hours.

    When you lease a car with OSV there are no hidden costs, request a call back and we’ll find you a finance, lease or purchasing deal designed just for you.

    Looking to buy a Ford on finance but confused by all the options?
    Our experts can help you find the perfect Ford Mondeo Vignale Estate for your needs and budget.
    Have questions? Looking for a great deal on a new vehicle?
    Help from a vehicle specialist is just a phone call away...
    Back to top