Here’s How You Could Install Your Own Rear View Camera

Rear_view_mirror_view_in_Mt._Rainier_National_Park,_driving_to_Longmire

Three former Apple employees have developed a product called RearVision that can be installed in your car, and which will help prevent you from running over pets, bikes, kids and old people.

Aimed at cars that don’t already have a rear view camera, the product by startup Pearl Automation can be installed thus: First, you need to install a license plate frame that is armed with a pair of very small high-def cameras.

Then, you need to plug an adapter onto your vehicle’s on-board diagnostics port.

Then, mount your smartphone to your car’s dashboard, and boom! you’ve got a 180-degree view of the rear.

Cheap, Easy-To-Install Rear View Camera Solution

Buyers can already get their hands on after-market rear vision cameras, but these require a lot of expertise to install and need single-purpose screens.

The RearVision camera will cost you $500, but Bryson Gardner of the startup behind the camera insists this is surely not a high price to pay for tech that could potentially save lives.

Moreover, the camera can be self-fitted onto any existing car, while buying a new car equipped with such safety technology would cost you at least £24,000.

The guys behind the camera were part of Apple’s iPod team before quitting in 2013 to go their own way.

They say their new startup is driven by the idea that buyers would prefer to have “more driver awareness” tech, but can’t afford to splash out on a new car in order to have it.

The startup expects there to be huge demand for cheap, easy-to-install solutions to complex problems, and RearVision could be just the beginning.

Will Titterington
  • 22nd June 2016

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