Lexus Rc F Coupe

Review Of The Lexus RC F Coupe

Driving never felt this good. The new two-door Lexus RC F Coupe is basically sex on four wheels that offers full-fat performance, top-notch build quality and more standard kit than rivals.

On the road it’s a monster, while inside it’s a bit posh. Don’t worry, though, because all that luxury is deceiving. This isn’t a polite hatchback with good manners. But, hey, who doesn’t want to drive like a savage while feeling amazingly comfortable?

Check the numbers (they’re mouth watering): 471bhp. 5.0-litres and 0-62 in 4.5 seconds.

And for anyone who loves their old-school sports cars, the RC F is powered by a naturally-aspirated V8 engine. There isn’t a turbocharger in sight. Instead, there’s a symphonic engine noise that will make you giddy.

Interested? OSV takes a closer look at what it’s all about with our Lexus RC F Coupe review.

On The Road

Just one engine is offered, but it’s all you need. A naturally aspirated V8 5.0-litre petrol engine, it produces up to 471bhp, and launches you from rest to 62mph like a catapult in just 4.5 seconds. Top speed is 168mph and despite all that power, it’s also easy to drive when you want to take it easy. It’s totally brand new for this model, and barks with more ferocity than many of us are used to from a Lexus.

It’s not too noisy under 4,000rpm, though. It’s bassy soundtrack murmurs and mutters restlessly like an animal in a cage that’s dying to be released. And when you do put your foot down and let the beast out, you’ll know about it. The engine roars and bellows and picks up speed like a cheetah on the hunt.

a bright blue lexus rc-f coupe in dark warehouse with sun shining through the windows

In a sense, then, the RC F Coupe is a two-headed monster: Calm one moment, savage the next. Kinda similar to a Mercedes AMG.

The steering is responsive and changes direction swiftly, although it’s not quite as quick as the BMW we’ll be comparing it to shortly. Splash out on the RC F Carbon model, though, and you’ll get a torque-vectoring differential which boosts agility. That said, it makes the car feel artificial and actually isn’t worth the extra money. The standard setup is just dandy.

Adjustable suspension is included in the standard setup. It lets you soften or firm-up the suspension, according to your mood or the conditions. The Lexus also uses sensors that are forever monitoring both your driving and the conditions so that it can tweak the damping accordingly.

Moreover, while the standard setup doesn’t make the RC F Coupe as slinky and agile as some rivals, it offers all the luxury and feral performance you want.

Lexus RC F Coupe Interior, Design & Build

the dark leather interior of the lexus rc-f coupe

Lexus might be the alternative choice next to the big 3 German cars, but the RC F Coupe is arguably just as impressive inside. The interior is luxurious and sparkles with quality.

The materials look and feel expensive, the switch gear is robust, and we expect the cabin to stand the test of time. All models are well-equipped, as we’ll soon find out, but only the Carbon trim gets Alcantara upholstery.

The controls are mostly neatly arranged, with just a few minor ones awkwardly placed. The infotainment system is now controlled by a touchpad, but it isn’t as easy to use as rivals.

A screen sits in front of you that changes what you see depending on which driving mode you’ve selected. It’s a useful feature that looks great, and is a further sign of how much thought Lexus are putting into their cars today.

There are only two doors, which might put some buyers off. But space up front is good, with the driver’s seat adjusting for height. The steering wheel adjusts for reach and height, which makes it easy to find the right position.

All seats are comfortable and supportive, but the two back seats are cramped. The windows are small, the roof is darkly lined, and this can create the feeling of claustrophobia.

Still, storage space is good and includes an air conditioned glove box and a few door pockets. The boot, meanwhile, measures 366-litres.

Equipment & Safety Of The Lexus RC F Coupe

The Lexus RC F Coupe is expensive to buy outright, but it’s got much more standard kit than its rivals. In fact, you’ll barely need to dip your toe into the list of optional extras.

All models get cruise control, electrically operated front seats, climate control and a reversing camera as standard. They also get a 7” colour screen, a sat nav and a DAB radio.

If you do decide to peruse the options list, a Mark Levinson stereo stands out.

Euro NCAP hasn’t crash-tested the car yet (and they might not). But standard safety kit is good and includes 8 airbag’s, traction control, electronic stability, and ISOFIX child-seat mounts. You also get blind-spot monitoring and lane-departure warning.

Costs Of The Lexus RC F Coupe

Prices for the new car start out from £61,300 and rise to £69,300. For more information on our leasing deals, check out our page here.

In terms of its running costs, the RC F Coupe has – unsurprisingly – a big appetite. It wolfs down fuel like there’s no tomorrow, and it’s unlikely that you’ll ever return 26.2mpg, which is the official number. Instead, you’ll be looking at averaging 20mpg at best.

Meanwhile, with emissions as high as 252g/km of CO2, this Lexus bad boy will cost £490 to tax each year. If you’ve got the stomach (and the wallet) for that, the good news is that it will cling onto almost 50% of its original price after 3 years.

Pros and Cons Of The Lexus RC F Coupe

Pros:

Gloriously Noisy

Being naturally aspirated means it’s always in full voice. Delightful. Even grandma might appreciate it.

Good Amount of Standard Kit

We love Lexus because they treat their buyers so well. The list of optional extras is slender, thanks to the standard model getting a 10-speaker Mark Levinson stereo, rain sensing wipers, sat nav, reverse camera and a 7” high-res multimedia screen.

Holds Onto Its Value Well

It’s forecast that the Lexus RC F Coupe will hold onto 48% of its price after three years of ownership. That’s because it’s such a rare car to see on the road.

Cons:

Cramped In The Back

It’s hard to see the point of rear seats in what is clearly meant to be a two-seater.

Not Quite As Fun As Rivals

Argh, Lexus tried really hard to mimic the ultimate driving machine in terms of how it handles. But they fell short.

Can you see yourself driving in style in the Lexus RC F Coupe? First, let's explore their prestige history

Lexus RC F Coupe vs Audi TT RS Coupe vs BMW M4 Coupe

Let’s see how the fares against its rivals in the comparison section of our 2017 Lexus RC-F Coupe review.

Lexus RC F Coupe vs Audi TT RS Coupe

The new Audi TT RS remains a modern day sports car icon. And it continues to be one of the mysteries of the Universe how something so small can be so powerful.

The headline-grabbing petrol engine in question is a turbocharged 2.5-litre unit that’s devastatingly quick. It produces up to 395bhp, and does 0-62 in 3.7 seconds. That’s almost as quick as a Porsche 911 – a car that’s much dearer.

And because the power is spread so wide, the in-gear acceleration will have your passengers foaming at the mouth. Top speed is 155mph. Add the Dynamic Package Plus and you can keep going until 174mph.

red audi tt rs coupe parked near stop road marking near the sea

The engine is not quite as growly as the RC F Coupe’s, largely because of the turbochargers. But it’s still got a menacing snarl that’s satisfying.

Sports suspension costs an extra £1,000, but we’re not so sure it’s worth adding. It stiffens things up which, while that reduces body lean, it does diminish ride quality.

If the turbochargers are good for anything, it’s bringing down running costs. Although the RS Coupe is the most expensive TT to run, its returns of 34.3mpg are significantly better than the Lexus. Moreover, it emits 187g/km of CO2, which is impressive for a car like this.

Inside, the cabin is A ++. Audi are renowned for crafting excellent interiors, and they’ve kept that going with their pumped-up TT RS rascal. It looks a lot like the standard TT, but gets figure-hugging sports seats that are adorned in quality Nappa leather. The steering wheel, meanwhile has been coated in Alcantara.

The new Audi TT RS Coupe is also a fairly useable car. It’s got four seats (although the rear seats are strictly for children), access is easy, while the boot measures 305-litres. That’s less than the Lexus (considerably), but you can expand it to 712-litres by dropping the rear seats. It’s also the same size as the standard TT.

Price:

Lexus – £61,300 – £69,300
Audi – £50,600 +

Lexus RC F Coupe vs BMW M4 Coupe

The BMW M4 Coupe is still a new car that’s a bit raw. But while we have no complaints with how it drives or how fast it is, turbochargers will reduce its appeal for some of you.

It gets its own unique engine, with the turbocharged 3.0-litre petrol unit built especially for the M division. It produces 425bhp, but this can be topped up to 444bhp if you add the Competition Pack. 0-62 is dusted off in 4.1 seconds, before the car maxes out at 155mph.

 

There is also a BMW M4 CS model available. It develops 454bhp, and does 0-62 in 3.9 seconds before maxing out at 174mph.

Surprisingly, it has good road manners in the town. On the motorway, it’s a fine cruiser, and when you want to ball it on country roads, it’s ready to raise Hell.

You can choose between an automatic or a manual gearbox, but we suggest sticking with the automatic. Not only does it let you change the speed of its gear shifts, but it also helps to keep running costs respectable. So, too, does the much-maligned turbochargers and some fuel-saving tech, including brake energy regeneration.

Thanks to all this, it’s 35% cheaper to run than the old BMW M3, returning 32.1mpg economy at best. It’s better for the environment too, and now emits 204g/km of CO2.

The CS model is actually even cheaper to run, returning 33.6mpg, and emitting 197g/km of CO2.

Inside, comfort is not guaranteed by the sporty suspension. However, it is adjustable and has a soft setting. Noise is an issue, though, with the high-performance 19” alloys thundering their way into your cabin.

That said, the interior is a gorgeous place to spend your time. The heated and electronically adjustable sports seats are befitting of such an upmarket coupe, and the whole layout is designed to be very race-car-esque. We love the Alcantara on the centre console and steering wheel, too.

The BMW M4 Coupe is practical, too. The four seats are some of the comfiest in any car right now, the boot measures a reasonable 445-litres, but the sloping roofline will limit headroom for taller passengers. Legroom is excellent, though.

Price:

BMW – £59,000 – £129,900

Verdict Of Our 2017 Lexus RC F Coupe Review

The last Soul was a dubious piece of machinery that polarised opinion. In 2017, it’s a much better proposition. However, it’s hard to look past its rivals if you want something a bit sexier that doesn’t cost as much to run.

The Soul still has its faults (economy is largely poor), but it does look more presentable, handles better, moves quicker and boasts a nicer interior. The Kia Soul Diesel Hatchback won’t set your world alight, but it’s a practical, sensible and affordable choice.

Lexus RC F Coupe

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Lexus RC F Coupe Review

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Lexus is better known in the UK for their SUVs, large saloons and hybrids, but they’re determined to crack the sports car market, and the Lexus RC F Coupe 500 is their latest effort. The Lexus RC F Coupe 500 is a muscular Coupe and indeed could be the sports car the brand have been…

Presented by Will Titterington


 

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