One In 14 Of Us Drive A Month After Taking Drugs

drugs, driving

According to a survey carried out by the road safety charity Brake, one in 14 Brits admitted to driving just a month after taking drugs – and sometimes earlier still.

The survey also revealed that 8% of Brits had shared a car with a driver who had taken drugs. One in six of us would willingly be a passenger in a car driven by a drug-driver.

The release of the study comes in the wake of fresh drug-drive laws that were implemented in 2015, and which are designed to make it easier for cops to catch drug drivers. It has been almost twelve months since the law was introduced, and police have reported a 6-fold increase in drug-driving convictions.

Road safety figures released recently show that in 2015 forty-seven road deaths involved a driver who was under the influence of drugs, while 197 serious injuries on the road involved drug drivers.

Hundreds of convictions for drug driving

Brake said: “The hundreds of extra convictions over the last 12 months prove just how overdue this law change was.

“Different drugs have different effects, some slowing reaction times, others making drivers over confident and more likely to take risks, but they all have the potential to make drivers a danger to themselves and all other road users.

“The Government must make sure the police have the necessary resources to carry out these tests and keep catching dangerous drug drivers who risk killing themselves or someone else.”

Direct Line, who helped to carry out the study, say that these extra convictions should serve as a strong deterrent to anyone who is considering driving after taking drugs.

Will Titterington
  • 8th March 2016

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