Kia Ceed Hatchback

  • KIA CEED HATCHBACK
  • KIA CEED HATCHBACK
  • KIA CEED HATCHBACK
  • KIA CEED HATCHBACK
  • KIA CEED HATCHBACK
  • KIA CEED HATCHBACK
  • KIA CEED HATCHBACK
  • image
  • image
  • image
  • image
  • image
  • image
  • image

Want this car at a great price?

Request a callback and we'll find you a great price to buy or lease.
  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.
Derivative
KIA Ceed Hatchback
1.0T GDi ISG 2 5dr
KIA Ceed Hatchback
1.0T GDi ISG 3 5dr
KIA Ceed Hatchback
1.4T GDi ISG 3 5dr
KIA Ceed Hatchback
1.4T GDi ISG 3 5dr DCT
KIA Ceed Hatchback
1.4T GDi ISG First Edition 5dr
KIA Ceed Hatchback
1.4T GDi ISG First Edition 5dr DCT
KIA Ceed Hatchback
1.0T GDi ISG GT-Line 5dr
KIA Ceed Hatchback
1.4T GDi ISG GT-Line 5dr
KIA Ceed Hatchback
1.4T GDi ISG GT-Line 5dr DCT
KIA Ceed Hatchback
1.4T GDi ISG GT-Line S 5dr DCT
KIA Ceed Hatchback
1.6T GDi ISG GT 5dr
KIA Ceed Hatchback
1.0T GDi ISG 2 NAV 5dr

Review Of The Kia Cee’d Hatchback

The Kia Cee’d is another fine example of how far the Korean brand has come in recent years. During the recession, Kia’s cars were at the bargain-basement end of the market. And when you bought one, you had to pretend to neighbours you were suffering from a temporary cash-flow problem!

Assuming that families have got a bit more cash in their pocket and can afford something better these days, Kia are now offering slicker, more upmarket cars. To this end, the Cee’d is spacious, safe, comfy, and still comes with an affordable price tag.

Even better, it’s one of the best-looking Hatchback’s on the road this year. Which means any family would be proud to have one parked up on their drive.

OSV takes a closer look at what it’s all about with our 2017 Kia Cee’d Hatchback review.

On The Road

Family hatchbacks are at their best when they feel safe and secure on the road – just like the Cee’d. It’s not a barrel of laughs, but it’s way more capable, refined and composed than Kia’s used to be.

It’s also easy to drive, and makes threading your way through urban sprawls a cinch.

What we think families will really appreciate about the car is how refined it is. Even on the motorway, you’ll hear very little external noise. The way it handles is also a strong point. It’s predictable, which equates to safe and grippy. Power steering is standard, and although it lacks feel, it’s a worthy feature.

a metallic blue kia cee'd hatchback parked on sandy road with shipping container in the background

However, this isn’t to say that there aren’t downsides. The Cee’d isn’t the perfect car, and it suffers from a firm ride. Surprisingly, the entry level model is actually the comfiest, thanks to its smaller wheels. That said, all models jolt and shudder over broken roads.

Also, the manual transmission is a bit too jerky for our tastes.

In terms of the engines, we recommend that you overlook the small 1.4-litre 98bhp petrol engine. It’s an eager beaver, but it just can’t cope with the cars sheer weight. We prefer the 1.6-litre 133bhp petrol engine, which can do 0-62 in less than 10.0 seconds.

A turbocharged 1.0-litre three-pot unit rounds off the petrols. It’s available in either 99 or 118bhp guise, with the former doing 0-62 in 12.8 seconds. The latter does it 11.2 seconds. While these numbers sound slow, the engine is bursting with character.

There are a handful of diesel engines to choose from, too. They’ll suit high mileage drivers well, with the 1.6-litre power plant the highlight. It delivers up to 134bhp, and can do 0-62 in 10.2 seconds. It’s responsive and makes financial sense.

Kia Cee’d Hatchback Interior, Design & Build

the interior of the kia cee'd hatchback showing the steering wheel and infotainment screen

The Cee’d has been given an interior makeover to match its exterior reshaping. The design is smart and easy on the eye, and the materials are robust and nice to touch.

The dashboard is at the centre of attention, with its wraparound design and its white backlit dials. Everything is easy to read and use, and we like the fact that Kia added the trip computer to all models. It’s comprehensive and looks great.

Soft-touch plastics are everywhere, though the neutral greys and dark tones of the cabin might be too sombre for some. However, the door panels get a lighter grey trim, which helps to lift the gloom.

Other nice touches include a piano-black finish that’s available on the higher-spec models. As well as that, fit and finish is hard to argue with, and we reckon the Ce’ed will stand up to the vigour of family life on the road.

The car fares strongly in the practicality department overall. Head and legroom is decent, and there is no transmission tunnel. That’s great news for anyone sat in the rear middle. Storage spaces are all over the place, and include an air conditioned, sizeable glovebox and some frankly massive door bins.

The fold-down central armrest is a neat feature. It’s only available on 2 trim models and over, and offers map pockets and two more cup holders.

The boot, meanwhile, measures 380-litres. It’s nicely shaped, though the load lip is quite high.

Equipment & Safety Of The Kia Cee’d Hatchback

Standard kit is some of the best we’ve seen in this market. The entry-level models get cruise control, electric rear windows and air conditioning. They also get a USB port, Bluetooth, and a 3-spoke multifunction steering wheel.

The 3 model is when the Cee’d really come into its own, though. It gets a touchscreen sat nav, mapping, and twin-zone climate control.

The 4 and 4 Tech trims are the luxury models. They get heated seats, leather seat trim, as well as keyless entry.

The GT Line finishes things off with sexier alloys and a panoramic sunroof.

Optional extras are sparse, but a DAB radio will set you back £250.

You won’t have to worry when it comes to safety. The Ce’ed bagged all five stars when Euro NCAP put it through its crash test paces. Standard safety kit includes a pair of ISOFIX child-seat mounts, braking assistance and electronic stability control.

Somewhat disappointingly, lane-departure is only available with the 4 Tech trim. So is speed-limit detection.

Costs Of The Kia Cee’d Hatchback

Prices for the new car start out from £15,300 and rise to £24,800. For more information on our lease deals, check out our page here.

In terms of its running costs, the Cee’d offer excellent value for money – unless you choose a petrol model. They’re costly to run, with even the small-ish 1.4-litre engine returning just 47.1mpg economy. Opt for the bigger alloys, and those numbers drop even further.

The more modern 1.0-litre petrol engine fares much better. This three-litre champ averages returns of 57.6mpg, and emits 115g/km of CO2.
The diesel are much cheaper to run. The 1.4-litre 89bhp CRDi model is good for returns of 67.3mpg, while the 1.6-litre diesel returns 78.5mpg. It’s also free to tax.

Pros and Cons Of The Kia Cee’d Hatchback

Pros:

Sharp Looks

Pretty much all Kia’s look great these days, and this is no exception. It’ll certainly look good on your driveway.

Good Running Costs

The petrol’s aren’t awful in terms of economy, but the real star is the 1.6-litre CDRi diesel engine. It returns a brilliant 78.5mpg.

Top Spec Model Is Attractive

The Cee’d have been in need of a facelift for a long time. Now that it’s got it, Kia has also added a very attractive top-spec model.

Cons:

Depreciates Badly

You won’t get much money back if you want to sell your used Cee’d on after three years or more. It will struggle to hold onto 38% of its value.

Dull Drive

It’s safe, secure and composed – but not much fun.

Can you see yourself driving around in the Kia Cee’d Hatchback? We recommend you take a look at their amazing history

Kia Cee’d Hatchback vs Citroen C4 Hatchback vs SEAT Leon Hatchback

Let’s see how the car fares against its rivals in the comparison section of our 2017 Kia Cee’d Hatchback review.

Kia Cee’d Hatchback vs Citroen C4 Hatchback

It’s not what you’d call exciting, but if you want value for money, the Citroen C4 Hatchback is worth a look. It’s cheap to run, and is an excellent practical family car.

The C4 gets you from A to B without any fuss – as well as without any fun. It’s comfortable and easy to drive, though it does have glaring deficiencies. For example, the steering lacks precision, while there is too much body lean in bends.

However, the soft suspension setup is a plus, and refinement is good.

metallic white Citroen C4 on a cobbled driveway with a modern building in the background

In terms of its engines, there are a trio of diesels and a pair of petrols to choose from. We like the 118bhp BlueHDi 120 diesel. It’s the midrange model, has decent pace and is affordable to run. It’s also not much slower than the larger 150bhp diesel.

It’s smooth, too, and makes good progress.

The petrols are a bit livelier. A PureTech 110 engine delivers 109bhp, and can do 0-62 in just under 11.0 seconds. A PureTech 130 model, meanwhile, covers the same sprint ever so slightly faster and produces 129bhp.

If running costs are a priority of yours, you’ll want to stick to the diesels, though. The entry-level 1.6-litre BlueHDi diesel returns almost 80mpg, though it will lack power for most buyers.

The petrols are fairly efficient – according to Citroen anyway. Both return over the 55mpg economy, though we expect the real world numbers to be a bit lower.

Inside, the cabin is smartly styled, and comfort levels are high. Exterior noises are kept out well, too, so that your on-the-road experience is satisfyingly relaxed.

The dashboard is a highlight in terms of its aesthetics. It’s sharply designed, though we would argue that Citroen has gone slightly overboard with the amount of buttons and switches. Apart from that, it looks well capable of standing the test of time.

Practically speaking, the C4 is hit and miss. Its 408-litre boot gives it bragging rights in this sector, but rear space is tight. Worse still, those rear seats can’t be folded flat for extra boot space. Instead, you have to lie them at an odd angle to boost luggage capacity to 1,300-litres.

Price:

Citroen – £18,000 – £22,000

Kia Cee’d Hatchback vs SEAT Leon Hatchback

metallic blue coloured SEAT Leon parked on tarmac with bare trees in the background

The new SEAT Leon Hatchback has for a long time been one of the most desirable cars in this sector. Racy, powerful and stylish, it’s got youthful appeal that young families love.

The Leon has always been sharp to drive, and we’ve gotta say that it’s sharper than ever. On the road, it’s an absolute blast. It’s responsive, its steering is accurate, and its gearbox shifts smoothly.

It’s also comfortable, and brakes well.

The quicker models actually handle better, but all models come with the brand’s Drive Profile system. This lets you flick between sporty or comfy.

In terms of the engines, you won’t get the best out of the SEAT Leon Hatchback if you opt for the 1.6-litre diesel. It’s sluggish. On the other side of the coin, it’s dirt cheap to run.

The turbo diesel 2.0-litre engine is much better. It comes alive in either 148 or 181bhp variant, picking up speed with ease. It’s always in the mood for a party, and is great for overtaking slow-moving traffic.

Three petrol’s are also available. We like the 1.4-litre engine the best. It delivers 123bhp, and makes the most sense for families who don’t mind having a bit of fun now and then. Even better, it’s relatively affordable to run with its returns of 54.3mpg.

Of course, that can’t beat the diesels, which all return more than the 60mpg economy.

A more expensive 1.8-litre petrol engine is for enthusiasts only. It can launch you from rest to 62 in 7.5 seconds, and maxes out at 140mph. For families, it feels unnecessary.

The SEAT Leon Hatchback isn’t just about fun. Indeed, SEAT are aiming to make this the best family hatchback on the market right now. To this end, they’ve paid a lot of attention to its cabin. The suspension ensures a cosseted ride, which the comfortable seats enhance.

The dashboard has gone up another level in terms of quality, and can now match the likes of the VW Golf. It’s simple, the buttons are clear, and we love the touchscreen that’s perfectly positioned for the driver. It’s easy to use, too.

Sound insulation has also improved. At motorway speeds, you’ll still struggle to hear exterior noises.

The boot has been made bigger. It now measures 380-litres, which is on par with the Kia Cee’d. It’s high lip makes it a little awkward to use at times, but its rear seats do split 60:40. However, like with the Citroen C4, they can’t be folded flat.

Access is easy, thank to wide opening rear doors, and both leg and headroom are better than before. Four adults can sit in comfort, but five would be pushing things. Interior space on the whole is much improved.

Price:

SEAT – £17,500 – £20,400

Verdict Of Our 2017 Kia Cee’d Hatchback Review

Kia has always been about value for money, but the last Cee’d had some issues. It was inefficient, and its emissions were higher than rivals. It still pumps more carbon into the air than most, but Kia has brought overall emissions down. Running costs have been improved too, and it’s now a much more environmentally-friendly car.

It’s also family friendly, performs capably, and looks great. We can’t fault its quality, too. Conventional and straightforward but with some style, the new Kia Cee’d Hatchback could become your family’s latest addition.

Has the Kia Carens Estate tickled your fancy? Let's discover why they offer a Seven-Year-Warranty here today

Request a call back from one of our Vehicle Experts

When you lease a car with OSV there are no hidden costs, request a call back and we’ll find you a finance, lease or purchasing deal designed just for you.

Looking to buy a Kia on finance but confused by all the options?
Our experts can help you find the perfect Kia Ceed Hatchback for your needs and budget.

Related KIA CEED HATCHBACK Articles

Review of the Model

Kia Cee’d Review

9th June 2016

The Kia Cee’d is due to be unveiled at the Geneva Motor Show in March 2015, and will see a few firsts to welcome it in. These include a brand new three pot 1.0-litre T-GDi engine, as well as a seven-speed Dual-clutch transmission, and a new ‘GT Line’ spec. The car has also benefited from…

Presented by Will Titterington


Similar Models

Choose other models with a similar bodystyle/class.

Have questions? Looking for a great deal on a new vehicle?
Help from a vehicle specialist is just a phone call away...
Back to top