Land Rover Range Rover Velar Diesel Estate

Review of the Land Rover Range Rover Velar Diesel Estate

The Land Rover Range Rover Velar Diesel Estate is the brands most desirable car yet. It looks absolutely stunning, drives well and it’s a totally new model.

The problem it has is that it’s in the same market as some very established names. And while it’s Land Rovers most sought after car, that doesn’t mean it’s necessarily the best in this class.

Land Rover is well-known as a quintessentially British brand. Read more about Land Rover’s history as a car manufacturer.

OSV takes a closer look at what it’s all about with our 2018 Land Rover Range Rover Velar Diesel Estate review.

Overview of the Land Rover Range Rover Velar Diesel Estate

On the Road

Land Rover claim that the Velar is their most dynamic car yet – a claim that’s hard to argue with. It’s based on the same platform as the Jaguar F Pace, which means aluminium makes up most of its underpinnings.

Steel springs come as standard, and this means that as well as being Land Rover’s most desirable car, it’s also its harshest. That said, its ride never gets too uncomfortable, and it’s also rather refined. Moreover, its ride is better than the F Pace, and if you opt for the V6 models you also benefit from air suspension.

Sticking to the small wheels helps with ride quality, too. On the other hand, the Velar looks better when paired up with bigger alloys. What you specify, then, will be a matter of your priorities.

Range Rover Velar

On the whole, while the Velar is fairly engaging to drive, it can’t match the F Pace on which it’s based. Instead – and perhaps unsurprisingly – it feels Range Rover-lite.

In terms of its engines, a 2.0-litre Diesel that develops 178bhp kicks things off. It’s a willing engine that can get you from rest to 62mph in 8.9 seconds but most buyers will be looking for a bit more pace and oomph.

The 237bhp variant of the same engine dutifully complies with a 0-62 time of just 7.3 seconds. That’s good going and helps to justify this car’s high price a bit more.

Topping the range is a 3.0-litre Diesel that produces 296bhp, and which can haul you from a standstill to 62mph in 6.5 seconds. It’s a belter on the motorway, where it makes overtaking look like a piece of cake. You’ll feel like Lewis Hamilton!

Maybe.

Land Rover Interior, Design and Build

This is a really stylish car – the most stylish car in Land Rover’s collection – and it’s clear that the brand have put form first when it comes to the cabin.

The design is minimal and a head-spinning triple screen setup is as hi-tech as things get.

It’s also beautifully put together, while a sloping roofline enhances its aesthetic appeal.

The entry-level model misses out on the aforementioned triple screen setup, a setup that’s worth expanding on. The top screen is a 12.3″ display, and it’s followed by a brand new Touch Pro Duo System that comes complete with a 10″ touchscreen. Once you start the screen up, it tilts forward so that it’s easier to use.

Once you’re all finished with it, it returns to its starting position. It’s smart, classy and forward-thinking stuff.

Range Rover Velar Interior

Some traditionalists might feel aggrieved that there are no physical buttons at all for the screens (except a pair of rotary controls) but you’ll soon get the hang of things. That said, three screens might be so overwhelming at first that you might find yourself taking your eye off the road.

Is the Land Rover Range Rover Velar Diesel practical? It’s smaller than the regular Range Rover but it looks pretty big from the outside. However, it isn’t all that massive inside and rear seat space is a bit tight.

Anyone sat upfront will have no complaints, and an adjustable seat and wheel help the driver lots, but things will be tight in the back – especially if you decide to squeeze in five adults.

Storage solutions are only average at best. The door bins are on the small side but the glovebox is a good size.

The boot, meanwhile, measures 673-litres and can be extended to 1,732-litres. That makes it one of the biggest in this class, although a large lip will frustrate.

Is Land Rover reliable? Read our honest and unbiased assessment of their reliability.

Equipment and Safety of the Land Rover Range Rover Velar Diesel Estate

Standard kit is good across the range. Included with the entry-level model is a 10” touchscreen, 18” alloys, cruise control, keyless entry and part synthetic and part suede seats.

Moving up to the S trim gets you the three screen setup, as well as an upgraded stereo, 19” alloys, sat-nav, a power-operated boot, real leather seats and auto-dipping headlights.

The SE trim meanwhile, adds a 12.3” digital display to replace the dashboard dials, a 360 degree reversing camera, and matrix LED headlights.

At the top of the range is the HSE model. It rounds things off with adaptive cruise control, a power adjustable steering column, a Meridian stereo and Windsor leather seats.

Safety wise, Euro NCAP awarded the car all five stars for its crash test performance. Its standard safety kit includes, but the entry-level model misses out on traffic sign recognition, a fatigue warning system and lane-keeping assistance.

Costs of the Land Rover Range Rover Velar Estate

Prices for the new car start at £44,840 and rise to as much as £69,999. For more information on our leasing deals, you can check out our page here.

In terms of its running costs, the most frugal diesel is the D180 model that manages returns of 52.3mpg at best. That’s not bad at all, but if you want more power and quite fancy the bigger 2.0-litre 237bhp diesel, the best you’ll return is 48.7mpg.

Meanwhile, the huge 3.0-litre D300 model is good for 44.1mpg, which doesn’t seem half bad when you consider how much power is on offer.

Pros and Cons of the Land Rover Range Rover Velar Diesel Estate

Pros:

 

Entirely new model

The Velar is Land Rovers first new model for some time, so if nothing else you’ll definitely be a trendsetter.

Looks fantastic

Honestly, Land Rover are producing some exceptional-looking cars these days.

Good over long distances

This is an area where the car excels, and it could clinch the deal for some buyers.

Cons:

 

Not as dynamic as rivals

It’s dynamic to a degree but if handling is your top priority, you’ll need to look elsewhere.

Expensive

It’s expensive to buy and run, and there’s also no frugal hybrid option available.

Land Rover Range Rover Velar Diesel Estate vs Audi Q7 vs Mercedes GLC Coupe

Let’s see how the car fares against its rivals in the comparison section of our 2018 Land Rover Range Rover Velar Diesel Estate review.

Land Rover Range Rover Velar Diesel Estate vs Audi Q7

The new Audi Q7 is a big, powerful car that was the German brands first SUV.

A lot lighter than its predecessor, the Q7 comes with four-wheel drive that arms it with enough grip to cope with all kinds of conditions.

High ground clearance meanwhile, ensures that passengers are cushioned fairly well from lumps and bumps, but it’s well worth adding the optional air suspension system if comfort is a priority of yours.

Also optional is a brand new four-wheel steering system that improves agility. Overall, the car performs well at speed, and you can chuck it into bends with enthusiasm and confidence.

Body lean is also kept to a minimum by an electromechanical active roll stabilisation feature.

In terms of its engines, a 3.0-litre Diesel that develops 214bhp is the smallest engine in the range. It has a 0-62 time of 7.3 seconds and it’s armed with a good amount of pulling power.

It’s a tad noisy when you push it hard, however, and for this reason, it’s easier to recommend the 268bhp variant of the same engine. It can get you from rest to 62mph in 6.5 seconds and works well with the 8-speed automatic gearbox.

Audi Q7

Rounding off the range is a huge V8 turbocharged 4.0-litre Diesel that develops 429bhp. It hauls the car from a standstill to 62mph in just 4.9 seconds, spreads its power evenly across its rev range and performs impressively for such a big car.

Running costs? The smallest Diesel is good for returns of 48.7mpg at best and emits 150g/km of CO2. The 268bhp Diesel is hardly any less economical and can return 47.8mpg at best.

Inside, there’s a lot to like about the Q7. The minimalist dashboard is classic Audi, while the look and feel of the cabin is as upmarket as we’ve all come to expect from the brand.

Insulation is excellent, even when you fire the diesels up. If you need a large family car to relax in, this one is right up there.

It’s just a shame Audi’s excellent Virtual Cockpit system isn’t standard on the entry-level model.

Is the Audi Q7 practical? It might be a bit smaller than last time but – somehow – Audi have created more head and legroom.

This is also a seven-seater, and it’s a fully configurable layout. Moreover, six of the seats come with useful ISOFIX child seat mounts.

The third row, however, is really only for children, although adults can squeeze in there for quick trips.

The boot measures 295-litres when all seven seats are up and 770-litres when you fold the third row.

Price:

Land Rover – £44,840 – £69,999
Audi – £51,325

Land Rover Range Rover Velar Diesel Estate vs Mercedes GLC Coupe

Based on the C Class, the Mercedes GLC Coupe is luxurious, comfortable and more compact than the GLE that came before it.

Mercedes wanted to make the GLE as dynamic as possible, but while there’s been an improvement on its predecessor, it still can’t match the likes of the F Pace for driver involvement.

It’s largely the steering that lets it down. It lacks feel and instead spends most of its time trying to cope with the cars hefty frame. Body lean is also a problem, as is the overly firm ride.

In terms of its engines, a 2.1-litre Diesel engine powers both the 220d and 250d models. It’s smooth and not as noisy as it is in the C Class, and it’s also impressively performative. The smaller variant can get you from a standstill to 62mph in 7.5 seconds, and it doesn’t feel strained until you really put your foot down.

If you want more power, you can step up to the bigger 3.0-litre Diesel that completes the 0-62 dash in 6.2 seconds.

Mercedes GLC Coupe

Running costs? Both the 220d and 250d return 56.5mpg, which is impressive for such a big car. The biggest Diesel meanwhile, develops 254bhp and manages to return 47.1mpg at best. It emits 169g/km of CO2 and has a BiK rating of 31%.

Inside, insulation is mostly good, despite this being a fairly tall car. Especially on the motorway, the engine settles down and road noise is well suppressed.

It’s a bit of a shame that the driving position is so low – hardly becoming of an SUV – although it does create a sporty feel.

The interior is as expected – upmarket and plush. That said, the cars infotainment system pales in comparison to the Velar’s three-screen setup.

Is the Mercedes GLC Coupe practical? It’s not as practical as its predecessor, with the sloping roofline limiting rear headroom.

The boot is smaller than last time and now measures 1,400-litres at the most. That’s miles behind the Velar and it also comes with a tall lip and a high floor.

Price:

Mercedes – £40,820+

Verdict of our 2018 Land Rover Range Rover Velar Diesel Estate Review

Not quite an Evoque and not quite a Range Rover Sport, the brand new Velar sits somewhere in the middle.

Being based on the Jaguar F Pace means that it drives well, while its long-distance capabilities are immense. The car is also stuffed with forward-thinking tech, it’s stylish and it’s good off-road. If you’re looking for that middle ground between the Evoque and the Sport, the new Land Rover Range Rover Velar Diesel Estate could fit the bill.

Get in touch to have a chat about your new car
Give one of our helpful team a call to find your perfect vehicle.
 

Interested in this car?

Contact us so we can help you find the perfect car.



See our Privacy Policy or Terms

 
ARE YOU INTERESTED IN GETTING A 4x4?
Get in touch with us on 01903 538835 or request a call back. We look forward to hearing from you.
Back to top